These are the prices for a proper installation from a professional – as a word to the wise, HVAC systems require fine tuning and the custom fabrication of parts during installation to work properly, otherwise they will likely fail prematurely. But there are plenty of people who will do it for cheaper than this, using substandard, used, or stolen equipment (stolen from construction sites and new housing developments). Or, they are using unskilled laborers with no experience, etc. But HVAC is not a “we’ll figure it out trade;” there is a right way and a wrong way to do things. There are just too many predatory companies out there, so be careful. I’d highly recommend not skimping on your HVAC contractor. If you go cheap, you will typically pay more in the long run...and in California, that will be a lot!
They work less jobs, thus increasing profits – think about it…if they got only half of the jobs, then they only pay half of the money required to pay employees, expenses, etc., but still have the same amount of net profit. In fact, if you do the math, they actually make more profit that their competitors do…twice as much, once you factor in their savings form only doing half of the jobs at the same amount of profit (Total Revenue – (half the normal expenses) = twice the profit). In other words, they save money by doing half of the jobs as others, for the same profit, thus increasing their overall profits.

PickHVAC Tips: Don’t be sold on systems with features you don’t want or need. Called “upselling,” it is rampant in the HVAC industry. Some features are nice – if you want them. If your single-stage furnace was loud and pushed out cold air at the start of the cycle, then a two-stage model will improve those issues. If you didn’t notice them, the upgrade will be a waste of money. That’s just one common example.
Although HVAC is executed in individual buildings or other enclosed spaces (like NORAD's underground headquarters), the equipment involved is in some cases an extension of a larger district heating (DH) or district cooling (DC) network, or a combined DHC network. In such cases, the operating and maintenance aspects are simplified and metering becomes necessary to bill for the energy that is consumed, and in some cases energy that is returned to the larger system. For example, at a given time one building may be utilizing chilled water for air conditioning and the warm water it returns may be used in another building for heating, or for the overall heating-portion of the DHC network (likely with energy added to boost the temperature).[4][5][6]
An air conditioning system's SEER is especially important if you live in a climate that changes temperature dramatically. The SEER is determined by the cooling output during the winter divided by its electric input during the winter. The higher the rating, the more efficient it will be. In January of 2006, the U.S. put standards in place for cooling units which are still in effect today. They must have a minimum SEER of 13. So, if you live in a home with a system installed before the new standards went into effect, consider having it replaced. SEER 13 units increase home efficiency by 30 percent.
HVAC equipment is estimated to last about 15 to 20 years. Yet over the years, parts go out and need to be repaired. Heat sensors, exchangers, and ducts can become worn out. Air conditioning motors may need repairing from time to time. For repairs to your heating and air conditioning systems, and even general maintenance, let HomeAdvisor help. Enter your zip code and let us connect you with prescreened HVAC repair services near you.
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