Those of you who read our posts regularly know that we built our reputation as a U.S. Veteran-Owned business that prides ourselves on giving people straight, honest answers to their questions...and there’s no question that makes people cringe more than asking, what does a new HVAC installation cost? Oddly enough, most contractors keep their air conditioning installation cost a closely guarded secret, as if the knowledge of how much it should cost will somehow change your decision when you have to buy a new AC. What I will tell you, is that the fair price of an HVAC installation will vary greatly based on the type of heating and air conditioning system installed, as well as the options needed or desired (Ductwork included? Zoning system?). In this article, we’ll discuss the five system features that affect HVAC installation cost, fair price ranges you can expect to pay for your new system, we will then perform an example calculation of how you can calculate a fair price, and finally, what you can do to keep from getting ripped off on your new HVAC installation price.
A little simple math can help determine the size system you need. A rule of thumb is 20 BTUs per square foot. So, a 500 square foot room would need 10,000 BTUs to cool or warm it efficiently. This assumes that you live in a temperate region and have adequate insulation with no energy loss. In the real world, all units have some degree of energy loss. This is reflected in an HVAC system's SEER rating for cooling and AFUE rating for heating.
A BTU is the amount of energy required to heat or cool one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. So a 1-ton air conditioner can cool 12,000 pounds of water by one degree every hour. That’s all it means, so don’t let yourself be lost in jargon! How this affects your HVAC installation cost is that the larger your house is, the more tons will be required to heat and cool it.
What you might not know is that the brand you choose is one of the most important factors in determining a fair HVAC installation cost. So, before delving in-depth, let’s take a quick look at the average prices of a new air conditioner and matching coil by brand…keep in mind, these are the average prices (by brand) that contractors pay for your AC equipment, and it is meant to give you a rough guideline until you are closer to buying:
Engineers have pointed out some areas where efficiency of the existing hardware could be improved. For example, the fan blades used to move the air are usually stamped from sheet metal, an economical method of manufacture, but as a result they are not aerodynamically efficient. A well-designed blade could reduce electrical power required to move the air by a third.[28]
Lennox, on the other hand, is probably the most expensive unit out there and I can’t stand them.  In our (humble?) experience, they have a horrible logistics chain, making repair parts difficult to come by (sometimes taking weeks), poor customer service, and the parts cost three times as much. That’s not what this article is about, so read more in: Carrier vs. Lennox Furnace Review.

PickHVAC Tips: Oil burns dirty, so it is important to have your plenum and ducts checked to see if they should be cleaned when replacing an oil furnace. If you don’t clean the plenum and ducts when replacing the furnace, the new furnace might not run as efficiently and comfortably as possible due to restricted airflow. This can also reduce the oily smell sometimes associated with oil furnaces.
Two weeks go by and no phone call from HVAC Service regarding install date, or any update at all.  I call them to check in to see if they have put me on the schedule and when I can expect to have the AC installed.    You can tell by the discussion I had with the lady on the phone that they completely forgot about me and have not scheduled anything.  She says she needs to get in contact with the owner because she has no idea on the availability of the crane.  I was told that she would call me back by the end of the day with an update.  Surprise, surprise, no phone call.  
Free cooling systems can have very high efficiencies, and are sometimes combined with seasonal thermal energy storage so that the cold of winter can be used for summer air conditioning. Common storage mediums are deep aquifers or a natural underground rock mass accessed via a cluster of small-diameter, heat-exchanger-equipped boreholes. Some systems with small storages are hybrids, using free cooling early in the cooling season, and later employing a heat pump to chill the circulation coming from the storage. The heat pump is added-in because the storage acts as a heat sink when the system is in cooling (as opposed to charging) mode, causing the temperature to gradually increase during the cooling season.
If the AC doesn’t turn off, it may be time to clean the condensing unit. Dirty condenser coils won’t give off heat efficiently and will keep the unit running.  Another possibility: The contacts on the outdoor run relay may have welded together—something that can happen over time because of frequent electrical arcing at the relay. Before checking the run relay, turn off the power to the furnace and the condensing unit. Next, disassemble the relay and pry apart the contacts. This should do the trick until you buy a replacement—which you should do soon.
Roof-mounted systems have the heating and cooling systems in one cabinet. Sometimes called "gas packs" (if the heater uses natural gas), they typically cost less than a comparable split system. In dry regions, most homes originally had "swamp-coolers" installed. When replacing them with HVAC systems, it's often cheaper to use existing mounts and ducting.
Prices for central-air HVAC systems will vary. The national average to hire an HVAC specialist is $2,920-$3,670 but can run as high as $5,000 or even $12,000 depending on the capacity you need and other factors. Installing central air conditioning requires an entire system that works together to draw hot air out of your home. The system includes an outdoor unit, which houses the condenser and compressor, and the evaporator coils. If you don’t have an existing duct system, ductwork will need to be installed, which will affect labor and material costs. Leaking or damaged ducts will also need to be replaced.

HVAC equipment is estimated to last about 15 to 20 years. Yet over the years, parts go out and need to be repaired. Heat sensors, exchangers, and ducts can become worn out. Air conditioning motors may need repairing from time to time. For repairs to your heating and air conditioning systems, and even general maintenance, let HomeAdvisor help. Enter your zip code and let us connect you with prescreened HVAC repair services near you.
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