An AC contactor is a $25 mechanical relay that uses low-voltage power from the thermostat to switch 220-volt high-amperage current to the compressor and condenser fan. AC contactors can wear out and are at the top of the list of common air conditioning service failures. Even if your AC contactor is working, it pays to replace it every five years or so. Unscrew the old AC contactor before removing the wires. Then move the wires to the new unit (Photo 6).


Your contractor will do a load calculation to determine the proper central air conditioning unit for your home. This calculation accounts for the climate, size, shape and orientation of your home, as well as its square footage. A professional will also look at the insulation, windows, walls, floors and other materials that compose your home. He/she will then examine any leaks, seals and existing ducts or vents.


An EER certifies the cooling efficiency of HVAC units. It's calculated by the rate of the cooling in British thermal units (Btus) per hour and divided by the rate of energy input in watts at a specific temperature. The calculation goes as BtuH/WATT at dry bulb (db) versus wet bulb (wb) temperatures. The optimal rating for a cooling unit is about 80db/67wb inside and 95db/75wb outside.
In the United States, HVAC engineers generally are members of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), EPA Universal CFC certified (for installation and service of CFC HVAC devices), or locally engineer certified such as a Special to Chief Boilers License issued by the state or, in some jurisdictions, the city. ASHRAE is an international technical society for all individuals and organizations interested in HVAC. The Society, organized into regions, chapters, and student branches, allows exchange of HVAC knowledge and experiences for the benefit of the field's practitioners and the public. ASHRAE provides many opportunities to participate in the development of new knowledge via, for example, research and its many technical committees. These committees typically meet twice per year at the ASHRAE Annual and Winter Meetings. A popular product show, the AHR Expo, is held in conjunction with each winter meeting. The Society has approximately 50,000 members and has headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia.
As for the price I think my review was fair in stating what value we got for what I deemed to be a slightly higher price than others might charge.  I did not take any stars off for the price, and still am not, but I am taking another star off because of Alberto's comments, which are deceptive and not the same thing he told me in person.  Alberto, I suggest you stick with the high road in the future.
We bought 2 top of the line Lennox HAC for $29,000 less about $3,500 rebates, thinking they would at least last 10 years. Well, after 6 years, the system leaked. We are paying $1,700 to fix that leak. We thought at least it is still under warranty - yes BUT - the warranty covered $15 & the rest we were up for ,even though they advertise 10 year warranty. We are trying to sell & move out of high cost southern Calif & have looked at 20+ places in Arizona. Most of the houses we looked at were built from 1998 to 2005. We asked if the HAC was original & in most case it was - even though the highs were 115 to 120 & the lows 90F - versus where we live the highs run 85 to 95 & the lows are in the 60s. I asked the repairman WHY ours went out at 6 years. He replied that they just do not build them the same anymore. In Arizona, I did not see any Lennox - mostly Trane or Carrier. We had Fujistu in Australia which were fantastic - nothing went wrong in the 9 years we had them. Also, they had full induction motors not like the energy consuming 2 stage motors in Lennox. Maybe the Japanese built Fujusita still builds quality & the warranty is meaningful?
DIY: We don’t recommend a DIY approach. Depending on the system, working with gas, electricity and refrigerant create dangers. Beyond that, it is essential that split system components be selected for compatibility. DIY installation of an HVAC system will void the warranty of most brands. The manufacturers won’t stand behind the warranty when anyone other than a certified installer does the work. This is true since improper installation is the main cause of poor system performance and mechanical breakdowns.
Two weeks go by and no phone call from HVAC Service regarding install date, or any update at all.  I call them to check in to see if they have put me on the schedule and when I can expect to have the AC installed.    You can tell by the discussion I had with the lady on the phone that they completely forgot about me and have not scheduled anything.  She says she needs to get in contact with the owner because she has no idea on the availability of the crane.  I was told that she would call me back by the end of the day with an update.  Surprise, surprise, no phone call.  
Though this installation is not always complicated, it's best to work with an air conditioning contractor to ensure it's done correctly. Permits are usually required for this type of work and can be obtained by a state-licensed contractor. You should not attempt to install central air conditioning on your own since you need a license to handle the refrigerant chemicals (Freon) involved.
Prices, promotions, styles, and availability may vary. Our local stores do not honor online pricing. Prices and availability of products and services are subject to change without notice. Errors will be corrected where discovered, and Lowe's reserves the right to revoke any stated offer and to correct any errors, inaccuracies or omissions including after an order has been submitted.
AC air handler buzzing sounds. Do you hear a buzzing sound when you turn on the thermostat? The only thing that comes on in the house when you turn on the thermostat is the fan relay and fan in the air handler or furnace. Try switching the thermostat HEAT/COOL switch to OFF. Then switch the fan switch from AUTO to ON. The fan (only) should come on. If the air handler makes a buzzing sound, it probably has a bad fan relay or, more likely, blower fan.

Hello, We have a Hunter ceiling fan that no longer spins. It has power, as the light still works and when you push the remote you hear the clicking, like it's trying to engage, but the blades do not spin. Does this sound like a possible flywheel issue? I removed the Remote Receiver, part 85112-02, and apparently it's no longer available, but I don't think the receive is the problem. Any feedback would be welcome.


HVAC professionals in the US can receive training through formal training institutions, where most earn associate degrees. Training for HVAC technicians includes classroom lectures and hands-on tasks, and can be followed by an apprenticeship wherein the recent graduate works alongside a professional HVAC technician for a temporary period.[33] HVAC techs who have been trained can also be certified in areas such as air conditioning, heat pumps, gas heating, and commercial refrigeration.[34]
As you can see, if we know what the contractor is actually paying for specific equipment, we know what their labor rates are, and we know what they bid the project for, then we can also use some basic algebra (or just let the program do it for us because we’re lazy) to figure out how much of a profit they are making off of us (you) at different bid prices:
Having the most energy-efficient system ever built won't matter much if it's not maintained. Lack of maintenance is the number one killer of HVAC systems. Before each cooling season, it's recommended that your system get a professional tune-up. However, there are things you can do in the meantime to make sure your system runs efficiently throughout the year.
Natural ventilation is a key factor in reducing the spread of airborne illnesses such as tuberculosis, the common cold, influenza and meningitis. Opening doors, windows, and using ceiling fans are all ways to maximize natural ventilation and reduce the risk of airborne contagion. Natural ventilation requires little maintenance and is inexpensive.[19]
Compressor -- Compressors are outdoor components in your system. The compressor is the pump that circulates the refrigerants through the air-conditioner. You can hear it when it's running so you'll know if it's working just by listening. If it starts getting louder, your compressor is about to fail. If it makes no sound when it should be on, it has already failed. Compressors fail for a number of reasons. Most often they fail due to strain from another failed part such as the fan motor. Electrical storms can also damage compressors. If the sound from the compressor gets louder or if you see a decrease in performance, you should have your compressor checked. A failed compressor will not heat or cool your house.
You can adjust for seasons: During the summer, you can have the air conditioner stay off during the cooler morning hours and start cooling the house as everyone gets up and starts moving around. During the winter, you can have your heater stay off while you are away at work and turn on about a half hour or so before you get home so that you are coming home to a nice, warm house.
There are multiple reasons to replace your HVAC system. If you have built additions onto your house, you may find your old system no longer meets the requirements for the new dimensions. Perhaps a new technological breakthrough has provided features that will improve your comfort and air quality. Most often, however, you need to replace your system because it no longer works properly.
Air conditioning and refrigeration are provided through the removal of heat. Heat can be removed through radiation, convection, or conduction. Refrigeration conduction media such as water, air, ice, and chemicals are referred to as refrigerants. A refrigerant is employed either in a heat pump system in which a compressor is used to drive thermodynamic refrigeration cycle, or in a free cooling system which uses pumps to circulate a cool refrigerant (typically water or a glycol mix).

Although most new homes have ducts and vents already in place, many older homes have old convection heating systems or baseboard heaters without ductwork. In such cases, you will need to install ducts and vents to provide the air conditioning with a flow system. This would be the time to explore upgrading the existing heating system as well, as it will be much cheaper to do together.
Air conditioner size is measured in “tons.” However, the tonnage of an HVAC unit is not actually based on its weight. A “ton” is simply a measure of an air conditioner’s ability to cool your home. One ton is the ability of your air conditioning system to cool 12,000 BTUs (BTU stands for British Thermal Unit) in an hour. Likewise, a “2-ton” central air conditioner is able to cool 24,000 BTUs per hour.
HVAC professionals in the US can receive training through formal training institutions, where most earn associate degrees. Training for HVAC technicians includes classroom lectures and hands-on tasks, and can be followed by an apprenticeship wherein the recent graduate works alongside a professional HVAC technician for a temporary period.[33] HVAC techs who have been trained can also be certified in areas such as air conditioning, heat pumps, gas heating, and commercial refrigeration.[34]
Two weeks go by and no phone call from HVAC Service regarding install date, or any update at all.  I call them to check in to see if they have put me on the schedule and when I can expect to have the AC installed.    You can tell by the discussion I had with the lady on the phone that they completely forgot about me and have not scheduled anything.  She says she needs to get in contact with the owner because she has no idea on the availability of the crane.  I was told that she would call me back by the end of the day with an update.  Surprise, surprise, no phone call.  
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?
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