If you’re purchasing from a big-box store, you can expect to pay approximately $120-$1,000 for a window unit. Window units are appealing for their quick setup and relatively low cost, but they can use more energy over time than central air and only cool the room in which they’re installed. The price will vary depending on the type of air conditioner you buy and its cooling capacity. Window units, which require minimal installation, are one of the most affordable options on the market. Portable air conditioners don’t have the cooling power of a window unit, but they do have the perk of being transportable from room to room. Expect to pay between $225 and $800 for a portable air conditioner, on average. The cost of an air conditioning system with coils, condenser and line (not including installation or ductwork) can range from approximately $2,000 to $4,000 or more. If you don’t have (and don’t want to put in) ducts, a ductless mini-split air conditioner is a good option, although pricey up front. Pricing can range from $650 to $4,250 per unit on average; you’ll need one unit for each room in which you want temperature control.


So, naturally I respond with, “you don’t tell your doctor which medication to prescribe you, do you?” The point is, on the residential level, who you get to install your HVAC unit is far more important than which unit you choose.  Keep your options open and let your HVAC contractor make a few recommendations – that’s why you spent time finding a reputable contractor!
So HVAC sent Tony Diaz to my house. I was at work so he was subjected to the most excruciatingly exacting woman on the planet (my wife). Tony impressed her with his friendliness, professionalism and the obvious jouneyman-level knowledge of his craft. He found literally --burnt-out-- parts in our system and replaced them. It cost us a bit but I know enough about the parts to see there was no gouging on the parts and a fair rate for the labor. It wasn't cheap but it was fair and worth every dime.

To qualify for a tax credit from the federal government, you must save the manufacturer's certificate from your system. The IRS won't require the certificate at the time you file your federal tax forms, but they recommend keeping it with your records in case of an audit. It proves that you purchased a qualifying product. The government offers tax credits for:


The belt should slip right into place. If it seems to be too tight or difficult to set in place, it may be necessary to adjust the motor mount to provide more slack. Then you can re-tighten the tension once the belt is in place. Check the manufacturer’s specifications for proper tension—in most cases, the belt should deflect about an inch when you press down on it.
Some systems include an "economizer mode", which is sometimes called a "free-cooling mode". When economizing, the control system will open (fully or partially) the outside air damper and close (fully or partially) the return air damper. This will cause fresh, outside air to be supplied to the system. When the outside air is cooler than the demanded cool air, this will allow the demand to be met without using the mechanical supply of cooling (typically chilled water or a direct expansion "DX" unit), thus saving energy. The control system can compare the temperature of the outside air vs. return air, or it can compare the enthalpy of the air, as is frequently done in climates where humidity is more of an issue. In both cases, the outside air must be less energetic than the return air for the system to enter the economizer mode.
In variable climates, the system may include a reversing valve that switches from heating in winter to cooling in summer. By reversing the flow of refrigerant, the heat pump refrigeration cycle is changed from cooling to heating or vice versa. This allows a facility to be heated and cooled by a single piece of equipment by the same means, and with the same hardware.
BIG THANK YOU for being honest, and advising us that for some reason the fuse/switch was in the reverse position so the AC unit would not properly turn on.   The unit turned back on immediately, and began cooling the house.   And then providing advice that the AC/Heating system needed some TLC, and giving us options to save money by purchasing a maintenance plan that included the filters plus cleaning services since we were already being charged for the service today.

Ventilating or ventilation (the V in HVAC) is the process of exchanging or replacing air in any space to provide high indoor air quality which involves temperature control, oxygen replenishment, and removal of moisture, odors, smoke, heat, dust, airborne bacteria, carbon dioxide, and other gases. Ventilation removes unpleasant smells and excessive moisture, introduces outside air, keeps interior building air circulating, and prevents stagnation of the interior air.


CIBSE publishes several guides to HVAC design relevant to the UK market, and also the Republic of Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and Hong Kong. These guides include various recommended design criteria and standards, some of which are cited within the UK building regulations, and therefore form a legislative requirement for major building services works. The main guides are:
I originally took off one star because of the SNAFU with getting the part ordered.  When Alberto called me on the phone he admitted the person had "gotten busy with other things" and apologized.  THAT was taking the high road and I was impressed by that.  Sadly, for reasons I won't guess at, Alberto has decided to take the low road in his comments and imply that they got the part as quickly as possible.  Well, we called at 2:30 so did someone spend six and a half hours finding the part??  That seems very doubtful.
Unfortunately, manufacturers and contractors don’t publish this information…it’s a secret. Why? Who knows…but we have access to a full contractor pricing database of 1,000’s of different units in our online HVAC installation cost calculator, so let’s choose one for our example calculation. We’ll go with Carrier equipment, since our readers always bother us about them (despite us telling them that they are overpriced):
It's always changing: Some newer thermostats take advantage of wireless technology. You can adjust your thermostat remotely so that if you leave and forget to adjust it, or if you are going to be home later than you thought, you can adjust it via your smartphone. Some can even give you reports on how efficient your system is performing based on usage. These are very efficient models, but they are also very expensive with some costing over $250.00.

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My Carrier furnace occasionally (one-two times a day) does not start. It shows error code 15 ("BLOWER MOTOR LOCKOUT -This status code indicates the blower failed to reach 250 RPM or the blower failed to communicate to the variable speed furnace control within 30 seconds after being turned ON in two successive heating cycles."). However, when I turn off and on the furnace power switch it starts and runs fine for a while. Sometimes it runs fine all day, but does not start only once in the evening or in the night. It is 13 years old I was thinking to replace whole thing if repair cost is too high. But I am not ready to pay $10,000. 
DIY: We don’t recommend a DIY approach. Depending on the system, working with gas, electricity and refrigerant create dangers. Beyond that, it is essential that split system components be selected for compatibility. DIY installation of an HVAC system will void the warranty of most brands. The manufacturers won’t stand behind the warranty when anyone other than a certified installer does the work. This is true since improper installation is the main cause of poor system performance and mechanical breakdowns.
Be careful of dishonest HVAC contractors. There’s no magical formula to see if an HVAC contractor is scamming you, unfortunately, but remember that they typically do this in one of two ways: first, they are charging grossly low prices (far below everyone else), or second, they aren’t including what everyone else is. In the first situation, they will charge you change fees, other hidden fees, or they stole the equipment and are passing themselves off as legitimate contractors (very common in California these days). In the second situation, they are charging you a very fair price, but aren’t including what the other contractors are (i.e. charging $10,500 for the installation which is fair, but not including the ductwork which is a scam unless there is some other, complex stuff going on there).
Installation: The old furnace is disconnected from the ductwork plenum, exhaust flue, gas and electrical hookups. In most cases, a new plenum must be made onsite or ordered from a local sheet metal fabricator. A new vent might be required too. The furnace is set and reconnected. Adjustments to the blower fan speed and burner are made to optimize furnace performance for your home and climate.

Window air conditioners cost less than central units, averaging $300. These systems generally suffice to keep a room cool on warm spring and summer days. They can bring added comfort for a reasonable price but are less powerful than a central air conditioner. If you have a bigger home with multiple rooms, you will probably need to have a larger system installed. Central air can cool several rooms at once, while window AC units usually only cover one or two rooms at a time.
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?
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